Solvent extraction and recovery

Abstract

Claims

Aug. 1, 1939. E. R. sMoLEY -SOLVENT EXTRACTION AND RECOVERY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 4, 1.935 Qwsui Aug. 1, 1939. E. R. sMoLEY SOLVET EXTRACTION AND RECOVERY Filed oct. '4, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 water as may have been introduced from the external sourcesabove referred to.v The amount of solvent in the constant boiling mixture depends on the characteristics oi' the materials. For example, with crylic acid as solvent, the constant boiling mixture contains only about 6% of solvent, while with iurtural, the constant boilare passed by the line 54 in`to the scrubber 6. This scrubber has suitable decks or other contact devices to promote contact between the ascend-- ing vapors and the descending chargeoil. 'I'he .charge oil passing through the scrubber should be at a temperature above the boiling point oi water, so that no steam will be condensed. The preferred temperature is about u-300 F., in which range the oil has a decided absorbing action on the solvent without appreciable condensation of steam or vaporization of oils. The temperature is brought to the proper value by the temperature control apparatus l, which may be either a heater or cooler, depending on the temperature of the charge oil. Practically all oi' the solvent may be removed from the steam by this method. Ii' desired, all of the charge oil may be used to scrub the vapors, but this is usually unnecessary, since the quantity of solvent in the vapors is small, being ordinarilyless than 1% of the total solvent in the system. The steam continues out through the scrubber at 56, substantially free of solvent, and may be .re-used for stripping steam in the column 40 as well as in the column for stripping the solvent from the raillnate. In this steam is localized the .water in the process above the limit of tolerance, and if the water introduced from all external sources is greater than the loss of steam in the system, some of the steam may have to be wasted to prevent its building up in theA system. This Wastage, however, is of no consequence, because it entails no waste of solvent. The charge oil passed to the extraction apparatus contains a small quantity oi absorbed solvent, but this in no way aifects the extraction step. l . According to a modiiied procedure, the solvent contained in the constant boiling mixture is absorbed in a finished oil product of the process, either extract or raillnate. This is shown in Fig. 2, wherein -the charge oil is run direct by the line 2 into the extraction apparatus- Ill. The equipment designated at i6, I8, 30, 34, 40 and 50 is the same .as in Fig. 1. A part of the extract withdrawn at 46 as the ilnal residue of the distillaa product at 64. I'he constant. boiling vapors leaving the reflux condenser 50 are run to the scrubber through a line 65. The solvent is removed from the vapors and the steam leaves the scrubber at 66. The absorbing oil and the ab- .stripping steam used for separating the solvent trom the extract and the ramnate. plus such' sorbed solvent are -cycled from the scrubber back tothe distilling step by aiine il which joins the line Il. running to the column Il. vThis process slightly increases the duty on the columns Il and 4I, but it oilers the advantage that theextract, having been taken direct from a distillation step. is already' at temperature approximately suitable for scrubbing, requiring the removal ot no considerable heat at to lower it to.the temperature n for absorption of the. solvent without condensation of steam. Apartortnenmshedramnatestreammaybe used instead of extract for absorption, since at the temperature necessary to prevent condensation of steam, the ratilnate and solvent are sumciently rniscible, but usually the extract is to be preferred as the absorbing agent, to avoid redistillation of t'lie high-grade raiiinate. The column Il and the scrubber, in either form ofthe invention, may be operated under a pressure differing from atmospheric. In vacuum operation, the absorbing agentwhether charge oil or a nished oil product, may be relatively cool, because ot the lower condensing point oi' the steam. Under super-atmospheric pressure, the absorbing agent must be at a higher temperature to prevent steam condensation, and this may be advantageous in promoting the absorbing action. Y In any event, reference to the boiling point of water or the condensing point of steam applies to the boiling or condensing point under the pressure existing in the scrubber. The invention may be modified within the limits of practical convenience. For example, it has already been stated that the fractionation in the dehydrating column I0 need not be perfect, and the vapors may contain some solvent in.addltion to what is contained in the constant boiling mixture. absolutely complete removal of the solvent i'rom the vaporsv in the-scrubber. II the steam is to be re-used as stripping steam, it is only necessary to reduce the concentration o! solvent to such avalue that its partial pressure is suillcient- 1y low to have no appreciable eiIect on the steam stripping operation. In such a case, it excess steam is wasted, as above described, some solvent will be lost with it, but the waste is so small and the solvent concentration is so low, that the loss will be entirely negligible. f Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is: 1. In a solvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an extraction step by contact with a solvent liquid, the solvent being of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water, the steps which consist in steam distilling solvent from a mixture resulting from the extraction step to form a constant boiling vaporfmixture of solvent and water, and `contacting the vapor mixture-with charge liquid at a temperature `labove that at which steam will condense to absorb substantially all of the solvent frornthe vapors. v2. In a solvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an Similarly, it is not essential to eiIect an tion being eiIected in part with steam, whereby A constant boiling vapors o! solvent and water are formed, and contacting the vapors with charge liquid at a temperature above the condensing point of steam to absorb substantially all ol the solvent from the vapors. 3. In solvent refining or petroleum oils wherein a charge oil is subjected to an extraction step by contact with a solvent which is of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water, the steps which consist in steam distilling solvent from a` solvent-oil mixture resulting from the o extraction step to form constant boiling vapors v fected in part with steam, the system containing water introduced from .an external source, wherebyconstant boiling vapors of solvent andwater are formed, contacting the vapors with charge liquid to absorb substantially all of the solvent while leaving steam uncondensed, and wasting a portion of the recovered steam in excess of that lrequired ior the distillation step. Y 5. In solvent rening of petroleum oils wherein a charge cil is subjected to an extraction step by contact with a solvent which is of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water, the steps'which consist in steam distilling solvent from a solvent-oil mixture resulting from the extraction step to form constant boiling vapors of solvent and Water, and contacting the vapors with a petroleum oil to absorb substantially all of the'solvent from the vapors, said petroleum oil being at a temperature above the condensing point of steam, and cycling the oil and absorbed solvent into the process. 6. In a solvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an extraction step by contact'with a. solvent liquid, the solvent being of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water, the steps which consist in steam distilling solvent from a mixture resulting from the extraction step to form a. constant boiling vapor mixture .of solvent and water, contacting the vapor mixture with a part of the residue of the distilling step at a temperature above that at which steam will condense to absorh substantially all of the solventfrom vthe vapors, and cycling said residue and absorbed solvent tothe distilling step. "7. In solvent refining o f petroleum oils-wherein a charge oil is subjected to an extraction step by contact with a solvent which is of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with Water, the steps which .consist in steam distllling solvent from a solvent-oil mixture resulting from the extraction step to form constant boiling vapors of solvent and water, and to leave a petroleum oil residue. contacting the vapors with a part oi', said residue to absorb substantially all of the solvent from the vapors, and cycling` the oil and absorbed solvent back to the distilling step. t. In a solvent extraction and recovery sys- Y tem wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an. extraction step by` contact with a solvent liquid. the solvent being of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water and having a relatively high proportion of solvent, the steps which consist in steam distilling the solvent from a mixture resulting from the extraction step to form a constant boiling vapor mixture of solvent. and water, and contacting the vapor mixture with. the charge liquid at a temperature above that at which steam will condense, to absorb substantially all of the solvent from the vapors. 9. In asolvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an extraction step by contact with furfural, said furfural forming'a constant boiling mixture with water in which the solvent proportion is relatively high, the steps which consist in distilling the iurfural from a mixture resulting from the extracm tion step, said distillation being enected in part with steam, whereby constant boiling vapors of furfural and water are formed, and contacting the vapors with charge liquid at a temperature above the condensing point oi steam to 'absorb substantially all of the solvent from the vapors. 1G. In solvent rening of petroleum oils, wherein a charge oil is subjected to an extraction step by contact with furfural which forms a constant boiling mixture with water, characterized by its relatively high composition of furfural, the steps which consist in steam distilling the iurfural from a iuriural-oil mixture, resulting from the extraction step. to form vapors of furfural and water, in which the proportion of furfural exceeds the amount normally present in a constant boilingv mixture, and contacting the vapors with a charge oil at a temperature above that at which steam will condense, to reduce the solvent in the vapors to less than 1%. Y A 1i. In a solvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected to an extraction step by contact with asolvent liquid, the solvent being of a character to form a constant boiling mixture with water and having a relatively low proportion of solvent, the steps which consist in steam distilling the solvent from a mixture resulting from the extraction step to form a constant boiling vapor mixture of solvent and water, and contacting the vapor mixture with the charge liquid at a temperature above that at which steam will condense, to absorb substantially all of the solvent from the vapors. 12. In a solvent extraction and recovery system wherein a charge liquid is subjected toan extraction step by contact with cresol, said cresci forming a constant boiling mixture lwith water in which the solvent proportion is relatively high, the steps which consist in distilling the cresol from a mixture resulting from the extraction step, w said distillation being effected in part with steam, whereby constant boiling vapors of cresol and water are formed, and contacting the vapors with charge liquid at a temperature above the condensing point of steam to absorb substantially all

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Cited By (12)

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    US-2423795-AJuly 08, 1947Standard Oil Dev CoRecovery of hydrocarbons and acetone from admixtures by phase separation and azeotropic distillation
    US-2443532-AJune 15, 1948Union Oil CoWax-oil separation with dehydration of solvent therefor
    US-2472499-AJune 07, 1949Texas CoSolvent extraction of oil
    US-2526722-AOctober 24, 1950Texas CoSolvent refining of light oils
    US-2529274-ANovember 07, 1950Texas CoSolvent refining of light oils
    US-2593931-AApril 22, 1952Kellogg M W CoMethod of recovering selective solvents
    US-2604430-AJuly 22, 1952Texas CoContinuous process for separation of waxlike constituents from oil
    US-2964465-ADecember 13, 1960Standard Oil CoAdsorption-desorption process for the removal of minor amounts of solvent from the product streams of solventextracted naphthas
    US-2969317-AJanuary 24, 1961Texaco IncPetroleum treating process
    US-3026254-AMarch 20, 1962Phillips Petroleum CoPurification of furfural
    US-3068245-ADecember 11, 1962Du PontFurfural recovery process
    US-4057491-ANovember 08, 1977Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Solvent recovery process for N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone in hydrocarbon extraction